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The surfaces that kill bacteria and viruses

By copying the texture of insect wings or using new types of materials to create surfaces that kill or inhibit microbes, we could stop infections before they even get into the body.
Currently, 700,000 people die each year of drug-resistant diseases.
As Larrouy-Maumus, an infectious disease researcher at Imperial College London in the UK, warns, “If we do nothing, 10 million people per year will die.”
He is among those looking for new ways to tackle antimicrobial resistance. His plan is to turn the very surfaces that many of these pathogens use to spread from person to person into weapons against them.
https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200529-the-surfaces-that-kill-bacteria-and-viruses


A New Type of Antibiotics Help the Immune System Fight Pathogens

Reporting in Nature, scientists have identified a new group of compounds that may help us get out of the antibiotic-resistant bacteria crisis. These novel drugs work by improving the immune system’s natural ability to fight pathogens while also battling the infection directly.
https://www.labroots.com/trending/microbiology/19530/type-antibiotics-help-immune-system-fight-pathogens


AMR, the next pandemic?

It is now estimated 700,000 people die each year as a result of drug-resistant diseases, with this number predicted to increase to over 10 million deaths per year by 2050. The current COVID-19 pandemic appears to have accelerated the threat of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), as many patients admitted to hospitals displaying COVID-19 symptoms are treated with antibiotics to reduce their chances of contracting secondary bacterial infections, making resistant bacteria more common.
https://microbiologysociety.org/blog/antimicrobial-resistance-the-next-pandemic.html


Dealing with antimicrobial resistance during COVID-19

To coincide with Antimicrobial Awareness Week 2020, a new report of case studies has been published that gives a platform to people living with drug-resistant infections, those that have survived them, and to the clinicians contending with them.
The report, from the frontlines of the pandemic in the UK, US, South Africa and India, captures unique views on the COVID-19 pandemic, providing a first-hand look at how the real-life experience and challenges of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) collide with the realities of COVID-19.
The report is a warning that without action on the slow-moving pandemic of AMR, more lives will be lost and the fundamentals of modern medicine will break down.
https://www.healtheuropa.eu/dealing-with-antimicrobial-resistance-during-covid-19/104085/


AMR: what’s the issue, and why is it so important?

AMR causes 700,000 deaths every year and the numbers keep growing. Antimicrobials are drugs used against different kinds of viruses, bacteria, etc.; resistance is developed through exposure to these drugs or the misuse of them. But why are antimicrobials important?
Learn more about the disease and the global situation here:
https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/stories/2016-02-07/antimicrobial-resistance-whats-the-issue-and-why-is-it-so-important


How do we reduce antibiotic resistance from livestock?

AMR can be a source of danger for both animals and human beings. Animals are also prone to infections and antibiotics are a treatment solution for the infected ones. However, the mass use of antibiotics to protect the livestock’s health causes serious issues.
How does AMR work when it comes to animals? When and how to use antibiotics for livestock? Click here to find out more:
https://ourworldindata.org/antibiotic-resistance-from-livestock


Frontiers 2017: Emerging Issues of Environmental Concern

AMR is one of the biggest health issues of the 21st century – but what else is it threatening? The unnecessary use of antibiotics has created other problems such as the careless disposal of antimicrobials. Now, this is yet another environmental issue facing our planet.
How does the careless disposal of antimicrobials produce bacteria that can resist them? How does it affect the environment? How can we fight against it? Read more about the topic:
https://www.unenvironment.org/resources/frontiers-2017-emerging-issues-environmental-concern


AMR: a major European and global challenge

If current trends continue, we will revert to world where simple infections are no longer treatable. See European Commission’s fact sheet about AMR:
https://ec.europa.eu/health/amr/sites/health/files/antimicrobial_resistance/docs/amr_2017_factsheet.pdf


Antimicrobial resistance (AMR): definition by WHO

What is Antimicrobial resistance? Antimicrobial resistance happens when microorganisms (such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites) change when they are exposed to antimicrobial drugs (such as antibiotics, antifungals, antivirals, antimalarials, and anthelmintics). Microorganisms that develop antimicrobial resistance are sometimes referred to as “superbugs” .
https://www.who.int/health-topics/antimicrobial-resistance


The economic burden of AMR

The world needs accurate estimates of the burden of AMR threat in terms of both health and cost, and to parameterise cost-effectiveness evaluations of interventions aimed at solving this problem. See the WHO fact sheet for more information:
https://www.who.int/infection-prevention/tools/IPC_AMR_A4.pdf

Can we change our behaviour to prevent superbugs?

In some farming sectors, antibiotics are used routinely to maintain animal health during the year.
The invisible threat of antibiotic resistance is a health issue that urgently needs addressing by all of us, from farmers to consumers.
The WHO reported that reducing antibiotic use in farm animals could reduce antibiotic-resistant bacteria in these animals by up to 39% – good news for them and us.
https://www.rte.ie/brainstorm/2021/0107/1188209-antibiotic-resistance-superbugs-farming-eu/


Scientists pave way to reducing antibiotic resistance build-up in waterways

Around 70 per cent of the antibiotics we take as medicine ends up in the natural environment, through trace residues excreted by patients and inappropriate disposal of medicines, among other sources. Bacteria are also present in these wastewaters, and when they are exposed to antibiotics they can evolve resistance within these environments. This could mean an increased threat to human health, if resistant bacteria enter and colonise the gut, for example through swallowing water while swimming. The bacteria could then transfer resistance to human-associated bacteria, meaning antibiotics are less likely to work when they are needed…
https://phys-org.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/phys.org/news/2020-10-scientists-pave-antibiotic-resistance-build-up.amp


Antimicrobial resistance could get worse during the coronavirus pandemic

More COVID-19 patients are getting antibiotics when they don’t need them, and this could make the situation worse.
https://thehill-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/thehill.com/changing-america/well-being/prevention-cures/521455-antimicrobial-resistance-could-get-worse-during?amp


What Is Antibiotic Resistance?

Did you know that over 70% of antibiotics produced globally are not given to sick humans, but farm animals? This allows them to grow at unnatural rates, and live through the conditions of industrial animal agriculture.
“The world is heading towards a post-antibiotic era in which common infection”
This clip was taken from our film ‘Vegan 2020’ available to watch now on our YouTube…
60 seconds video on Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/tv/CJrDRO_hfid/?igshid=ofyy1vejqfqa


Powerful antibiotics discovered using AI

Machine learning spots molecules that work even against ‘untreatable’ strains of bacteria.
A pioneering machine-learning approach has identified powerful new types of antibiotic from a pool of more than 100 million molecules — including one that works against a wide range of bacteria, including tuberculosis and strains considered untreatable.
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-00018-3


We need new antimicrobials to prevent the next infectious disease crisis

Imagine if scientists had seen Covid-19 coming years in advance yet did little to prepare. Unthinkable, right?
Yet that’s exactly what’s happening with another infectious disease crisis — the one caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria and fungi. So-called superbugs already kill more than 700,000 people each year. And the World Health Organization warns that by 2050 the annual death toll could reach 10 million if we don’t use the time to get prepared.
The antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs needed to prevent such a calamity don’t yet exist — and they’re years away from patients.
https://www.statnews.com/2020/08/12/we-need-new-antimicrobials-to-prevent-the-next-infectious-disease-crisis/


Global Commitment to Diagnostic Tests to Fight Antimicrobial Resistance

AMR has become a top priority due to the possible global health and economic crisis that it has the potential to cause. Identifying the organisms causing the infection can help the AMR situation; diagnostics and diagnostic tests are the keys to achieving this.
How do the tests work? How can they be transferred into the system?
http://amr.bd.com/assets/pdf/8%20Global%20Commitment%20on%20Diagnostic%20Tests.pdf


Antimicrobial resistance

AMR occurs when the medicine used to treat a person’s condition becomes ineffective and, worldwide, this has influenced the treatment options for common infectious diseases. It is fast becoming one of the greatest threats to global health.
How does the resistance affect the body or other diseases and how does WHO see the issue? See more information here:
https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/antimicrobial-resistance

AMR and diagnostics: pointing the way to better infection control

AMR has a long history: evidence of antibiotic resistance genes dates back to 10,000 and 2 billion years ago as a response to natural antibiotics. Giving pharmacists a bigger role and improving diagnostics are some of the ways we can reduce the unnecessary use of antibiotics.
What changed over the years that made it one of the biggest threats of the 21st century? How can diagnostics processes and pharmacists help solve the problem?
https://www.pharmaceutical-journal.com/news-and-analysis/amr-and-diagnostics-pointing-the-way-to-better-infection-control/20203597.article


Effective IPC saves money!

Effective infection prevention and control (IPC) makes sense from a fiscal point of view, according to this UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) briefing paper:
https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/qs61/documents/infection-control-briefing-paper2