Bacteria resistant to medication are spreading across the world

They are a threat to the health of every one of us

It is our responsibility to take action at both the individual and collective level

Antibiotics are drugs to treat infections caused by bacteria. 
Antibiotic resistance is the ability of bacteria to resist the effects of an antibiotic.

We can only perform surgeries because we have antibiotics and can prevent the bacterial infection that the patient might contract during the operation.

If no actions are taken against the growth and spread of antimicrobial resistance, it’s going to be increasingly difficult to treat many common bacterial infections, and simple surgery can also become risky if the antibiotics will become less effective.

What can I do against the resistant bacteria?

  • Only use antibiotics when prescribed by a health professional

  • Do not demand antibiotics if your healthcare professional says you do not need them

  • Always follow your health worker’s advice when using antibiotics

  • Do not stop antibiotic treatment halfway

  • Never share or use leftover antibiotics

How does antibiotic resistance develop?

Bacteria can develop the ability to survive exposure to antibiotics designed to kill them or stop their growth.

They develop resistance against antibiotics.

This is a natural phenomenon, but if antibiotics are not used properly, this process will speed up.

How big is the problem?

The proportion of third-generation cephalosporin-resistant K. pneumoniae bacteria in 2018
  • 700,000 people die each year globally

  • 33,000 people die each year in the EU – from an infection caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria

Cephalosporins are the class of antibiotics prescribed commonly, they are usually well-tolerated. Cephalosporin allergy is rare, and they generally cause few side effects. They allow treating a variety of bacterial infections, but the resistance against them is increasing.

The source of the map: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). You can find the other resistance maps in the annual epidemiological reports here:
https://www.ecdc.europa.eu/en/publications-data/surveillance-antimicrobial-resistance-europe-2019 

Antibiotic resistance can affect anyone, of any age, in any country. (WHO)

Everyone can take action against antibiotic resistance

  • INTERNATIONAL  HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS (WHO, ECDC)
    • providing professional guidance
  • HEALTHCARE SPECIALISTS
    • use and adherence to professional guidelines and protocols
  • INDIVIDUALS
    • Only use antibiotics when prescribed by a health professional
    • Do not demand antibiotics if your healthcare professional says you do not need them
    • Always follow your health worker’s advice when using antibiotics
    • Do not stop antibiotic treatment halfway
    • Never share or use leftover antibiotics
  • LIVESTOCK SECTOR
    • not use antibiotics for growth promotion or to prevent diseases in healthy animals
  • ANIMAL HEALTH SECTOR
    • reduction/elimination of antibiotics used in human health
  • AMR DetecTool project
    • we offer rapid diagnostic tools to detect the multiresistant bacteria



 

PRESS RELEASE

Bacteria resistant to medication are spreading across the world.

They are a threat to the health of every one of us.

If the infection is caused by a bacterium that is resistant to antibiotics, treatment options are limited. It may even happen that the bacterium is not sensitive to any available antibiotics.

It is a global health concern and an increasingly serious challenge. If no actions are taken against the growth and spread of antimicrobial resistance, it’s going to be more and more difficult to treat many common bacterial infections, and simple surgery can also become risky if the antibiotics become less effective.

Antibiotic resistance develops when bacteria adapt to the presence of the antibiotic to which they are exposed. It is a natural phenomenon, but If antibiotics are not used properly, this process will speed up. Misuse of antibiotics can occur in several areas and situations: healthcare, agriculture and the veterinary sector – it’s everyone’s responsibility to maintain antibiotics’ effectiveness.

Let’s make sure that each of us is aware of what we can do to effectively fight antibiotic resistance. Everyone can participate in the mitigation! It is our responsibility to take action at the social and individual level.

To get more information on antibiotic resistance and what we can do both individually and on a larger scale, visit the AMR DetecTool website.

The EIT Health-funded AMR DetecTool project fights against antibiotic resistance by developing rapid diagnostic tests. The methods currently used determining the bacterium’s resistance are time-consuming, so the appropriate antibiotic treatment is delayed. Rapid detection is essential to prevent its further spread and to fight efficiently against multiresistant bacteria. With the breakthrough AMR DetecTool device, inappropriate antibiotics can be avoided, and the patient can receive an effective antibiotic in time.